Road to Infinity War – Ant-Man, or, So Much More Than Just Perfect Timing

Oh I did it fam. In preparation for my viewing of Avengers: Infinity War on April 26th at 7PM, I went back and rewatched the previous 18 films in the Marvel Cinematic Universe, from Iron Man to Black Panther. Every day leading up to Infinity War I’ll be posting a short piece on each film and my most recent hot takes on nearly a decade of the MCU. I’ll also be linking back to whatever old nonsense I wrote about the movies at the time, if applicable. And if that isn’t enough, check out my ranked listed of the MCU to date on my Letterboxd account here.

ant-man

Tried. So. Hard. To find the version of this poster that is just Michael Peña and Bobby Cannavale.

Ant-Man was instantly the perfect pallet cleanser after Avengers: Age of Ultron. Coming out so quickly after the second Avengers film I still wasn’t completely admitting my disappointment with that movie when I first saw this one. I didn’t know how to feel about Age of Ultron, but I instantly felt a fondness for Ant-Man. It’s charming and fun and it never once threatens to utterly collapse in on itself under its own weight, instead focusing in on likely the smallest (yeah, yeah) stakes we’ve seen in from the MCU.

Which is a good thing.

But rewatching Ant-Man, it’s so much more than just a welcome respite from the cacophony of its immediate predecessor. Ant-Man explodes with style and flavor. Quick pans. Brilliant montages. Cops and crooks with competing motivations. Christophe Beck’s sneaky, percussive score. Ant-Man commits to the heist genre in earnest, lending it the authenticity of a heist film that happens to have a superhero in it, rather than the artificiality of a superhero film that shoehorns in a few heist movie gimmicks.

Upon its initial release Ant-Man drew myriad comparisons to the first Iron Man film, allegations that it was the same cookie with different icing, traced from the same stencil with a different pen. Similar obligations were later lobbed at Doctor Strange, which I will similarly whine about when I write about that movie again in, like, two days. Such comparisons require an incredibly broad view of the films in question. I won’t bore you with a laundry list of discrepancies here, but, to my mind, the most compelling difference between the two films is the position in society from which its protagonists hail.

Where Tony Stark is a billionaire tasked with taking responsibility for his immense economic power, Scott Lang is a recently freed convict who can’t hold down a job at Baskin-Robbins. His is a new low for heroic status quos in the MCU, and one that begs some interesting questions about how morality and justice shift and distort with size and scope. When we meet Scott Lang he’s paid the penal price and continues to pay a societal price for crimes that come nowhere close to the collateral damage caused by Tony Stark’s misguided creation of a maniacal artificial intelligence. Scott Lang is certainly established as having a moral compass, but Ant-Man largely concerns him being forced into the position of a shrinking superhero because, justified or not, society will not let him live a normal life.

With that in mind, though I’d hoped to focus on just how good this film is in its own right, Ant-Man serves not only as the perfect follow-up to Age of Ultron, but also as an excellent thematic primer for Captain America: Civil War.

There’s some issues that keep Ant-Man in the middle of the pack for me, specifically its nonsense villain and the unbearable “protection clause” cop-out it levies against Evangeline Lilly’s Hope van Dyne (though that looks to be mended with the upcoming Ant-Man and the Wasp).

Ant-Man was one of the Marvel movies I was least looking forward to rewatching. I’ve never disliked the film, but I couldn’t get myself excited to watch it again. It was also one of the films that surprised me the most in just how much it exceeded by remembered notions of it. I may not have been looking forward to rewatching it, but once I popped it in I had an absolute blast. This is a really fun, entertaining movie that doesn’t get enough credit for its adept execution of style and the nuance of scale it lends to the franchise as a whole.

All of this is to say: Michael Peña, am I right? Michael. Peña.

For more Ant-Man ramblings, with admittedly less to say, from the time of the film’s initial release:

August 5, 2015: Perfect Timing, or, Ant-Man

Road to Infinity War – Avengers: Age of Ultron, or, The Selfless Marvel

Oh I did it fam. In preparation for my viewing of Avengers: Infinity War on April 26th at 7PM, I went back and rewatched the previous 18 films in the Marvel Cinematic Universe, from Iron Man to Black Panther. Every day leading up to Infinity War I’ll be posting a short piece on each film and my most recent hot takes on nearly a decade of the MCU. I’ll also be linking back to whatever old nonsense I wrote about the movies at the time, if applicable. And if that isn’t enough, check out my ranked listed of the MCU to date on my Letterboxd account here.

ageofultron

Whoa! Look at all the stuff!

After the first Avengers film and the conclusion of phase one of the Marvel Cinematic Universe the concept of the shared movie universe seemed like a proven, cut-and-dry formula: small, enjoyable-enough “solo” movies with charming characters that slowly pave the way for a climactic collision of costumes rewarding audiences for biding their time through Avengers hanging out by themselves and not avenging. For better and worse that all kind of falls apart with Age of Ultron and Marvel’s second phase.

Like Iron Man 2 before it, Age of Ultron serves as a sort of sign post for a point of no return, an alarm for when certain storytelling strategies have been worn out. In this case, Age of Ultron represents the last time Marvel could get by on quips and costumes alone. There’s certainly joy to be had from Joss Whedon’s sassy one-liners and the reunion of our heroes is undoubtedly action-packed, but this isn’t a direct sequel to The Avengers, this is a film that has to contend with the more organic humor of Guardians of the Galaxy and the more physical action of The Winter Soldier and ultimately comes up short on both accounts.

As it turned out, those enjoyable-enough solo movies could be astonishing, and those climactic collisions of costumes could be utterly unrewarding.

Age of Ultron feels like a response to Avengers and not much else. Where the first Avengers film built directly off of Iron Man, The Incredible Hulk, Thor and Captain America, nothing about Age of Ultron feels like a natural progression from Marvel’s second phase of films, be it narratively or stylistically. There are the compelling seeds of a story here, James Spader’s Ultron is quirky and menacing in his own strange way and the events of this film present compelling and integral moments in the grand story arc of Tony Stark, but whatever Whedon’s initial vision for his follow-up to Avengers was, it gets muddied in translation by what feel like corporate mandates.

This is the least self-contained film in the Marvel Universe due in large part to its seeming lack of concern with itself. Age of Ultron introduces a slew of new characters, goes legitimately all over the world and sets up threads for three or four future MCU installments, but it doesn’t allot much of its running time to just be itself. It’s a very selfless movie that way, and it suffers for it, coming off like a film without an identity of its own.

Because so much of this movie is so expository, most of the characters wind up being short changed, leading to an Avengers outing that feels like less than the sum of its parts. At times Age of Ultron feels like a party that’s being thrown in order to disguise doing chores. The party being an Avengers movie. The chores being tedious and, in retrospect, entirely unnecessary setup for the MCU’s future. There are some great sequences in this movie and some genuinely funny moments, but it certainly hit the brakes on the exciting momentum the MCU had been building since The Winter Soldier.

And now for a look back at the morning after I saw Avengers: Age of Ultron, a point in which I am both not yet prepared to admit my disappointment with this movie and compelled by a sense of duty to write something about this movie:

May 1, 2015: Avengers: Age of Ultron, or, Marvel’s Big Comic Book Movie

Perfect Timing, or, Ant-Man

Avengers: Age of Ultron was a massive movie. There was something like a million robots, upwards of five antagonists and one lavish, sprawling set piece after another, each in its own corner of the globe. What better way to follow up what is quite possibly the biggest superhero movie of all time than with what is most definitely the smallest installment in the Marvel Cinematic Universe yet.

Get it? Cause small? Cause ants? Cause I’m talking about Ant-Man?

SMALL ATTACK

SMALL ATTACK

Ant-Man applies Marvel Studios’ trademark, money-printing charm to the heist movie, a genre that traditionally entails far smaller conflicts than world-ending androids. The marriage of Marvel style and the heist genre winds up delivering what in many ways is the polar opposite of Age of Ultron.

Where Age of Ultron pits a genocidal robot hive mind devising an extinction-level event up against a flying aircraft carrier of speedsters, witches and more benevolent other robots in a city turned into an asteroid, Ant-Man sees a bald guy trying his hand at corporate espionage only to come up against a convict and a van full of his friends in a final battle that plays out on a toy train set. It’s exactly what the doctor order after a movie as dense, and some would argue bloated, as Age of Ultron.

Ant-Man is also great in its own right, largely because it’s hilarious. Whether you’ve heard a thousand times already or not, enough can’t be said about how fantastic Michael Peña is as Luis, one of the aforementioned friends in a van. He manages to steal the show from any and all set pieces, action sequences and Michaels Douglas.

The movie isn’t without its shortcomings, however. It aggravatingly finds its narrative almost completely reliant on the increasingly asinine “don’t tell the entirely capable, grown woman anything because she needs to be protected” trope. But the best special effects any Marvel movie has boasted so far, coupled with Michael Peña’s out-of-the-park comedic performance make Ant-Man the perfect breath of fresh air between the much bleaker Age of Ultron and the upcoming Captain America: Civil War, which is sure to be a dire tale indeed.

 

Avengers: Age of Ultron, or, Marvel’s Big Comic Book Movie

Superhero movies are nothing new. Long before everyone and their mother decided they needed a “shared-universe” Superman and Howard the Duck were running around on the big screen to the delight and chagrin of moviegoers. But in a lot of ways Avengers: Age of Ultron feels like the first full-on comic book movie.

BIG ATTACK

BIG ATTACK

It’s all there. From the exciting feeling that any one of dozens of characters could pop up just around the corner to the dead weight of ever-imposing continuity, viewing the second Avengers movie is like reading one of DC or Marvel’s massive semi-annual, line-wide , status-quo altering crossover spectaculars. And it comes with all of the same highlights and hindrances of a big comic book event.

Characters from across the Marvel Universe are brought together to interact with one another, be it with clever quips or exciting fisticuffs. There’s all kinds of fun pairings to be had, all in the face of massive, eye-popping set pieces and world-threatening antagonism.

But that epic comic book event scope comes at a cost on film just as it does on the page. The places Age of Ultron goes are huge, explosive and over-the-top. By the monstrous climax of the movie even Hawkeye points out the ridiculousness of it all. It’s spectacular and ludicrous and getting their in two hours requires a few lapses in logic. The same type of lapses found in massive event comics that have to condense a fight for the entire known universe into six issues. Age of Ultron is a fun, exciting ride from A to Z, but it makes that journey in way fewer than 25 steps and it isn’t graceful enough to cover up the letters it missed along the way.

A lot of that is because, much like a major comic book event, Age of Ultron is up to its neck in mythology. I feel confident asserting that Age of Ultron has to contend with more mythology than any other film ever made. It’s the eleventh film in a series that simultaneously has to react to not only its own direct predecessor but also a half dozen other sub-franchises while simultaneously setting up not only its own direct sequel but half a dozen others.

Just a couple of dreamy teens.

Just a couple of dreamy teens.

It’s a lot to grapple with and Age of Ultron doesn’t always do it flawlessly. A lot of the bigger moments wind up feeling a little out of left field and I find myself left with questions I don’t suspect there are particularly compelling answers to.

But Age of Ultron isn’t just like a big, brash comic book event. It’s like a really good, big, brash comic book event. The new characters introduced here are exciting. James Spader’s Ultron is fascinating and entertaining and menacing. The movie is consistently hilarious, the cast always charming and the dialogue sharp. The little, intimate moments in Age of Ultron are fantastic.

I recently posted a piece on Daredevil in which I put forth my opinion that the show is very much Marvel’s take on a DC movie, much as Winter Soldier was a Marvel political thriller and The Incredible Hulk was a Marvel fugitive movie. I suspect the most obvious argument to put forward for Age of Ultron is that it’s Marvel’s artificial intelligence movie, but more than anything before it Avengers: Age of Ultron is very much Marvel’s quintessential comic book movie.

Rhyme Attack!, or, Rage of Ultron: Like Age of Ultron But With an “R”

Rage of Ultron (you read right), Marvel Comics’ newest original graphic novel, is at once an excellent springboard for any excitement you might harbor for the upcoming Avengers movie sequel and something of a red herring for any uninitiated movie-goers looking to bone up on whatever the hell Ultron is.

ROBOT ATTACK

ROBOT ATTACK

As a standalone graphic novel Rage of Ultron is excellent. Though those unfamiliar with the current status quo of the Marvel Comics Universe might be thrown off by a character or two the story writer Rick Remender tells here is top notch. Forget putting a new spin on superhero yarns, with Rage of Ultron Remender ably offers an exciting new perspective on the rogue artificial intelligence, a story staple many of us are all too familiar with. Rage of Ultron uses macro observations about artificial intelligence and what constitutes life to drive home intimate, poignant character moments. It’s super hero literature at its best: big action paired with compelling characterization.

As an in-continuity (yeah, yeah, insert eye roll here) story featuring Marvel’s post-Axis All-New Avengers, Rage of Ultron is probably the first complete story to showcase Sam Wilson’s Captain America and the yet to be identified female Thor alongside other current focal points like The Vision, Scarlett Witch and Quicksilver. But at the end of the day Rage of Ultron is a story about Hank Pym and his titular maniacal robot son. Which brings about Rage of Ultron’s only potential pitfall.

The book is called Rage of Ultron for crying out loud. Its release less than a month before The Avengers: Age of Ultron paints a pretty vivid picture of an attempt at corporate synergy. But unless the promotional materials for Avengers 2 have not only been keeping a lot of cards very close to the chest but also straight up lying, Rage of Ultron isn’t exactly a perfect primer for Marvel’s next film, as the aforementioned relationship at the core of Rage of Ultron doesn’t appear to exist in its rhyming movie counterpart.

If you’re looking for a primer ahead of Age of Ultron, Rage of Ultron probably won’t be able to serve the same function as, say, Year One to Batman Begins, or Ed Brubaker’s collected Winter Soldier story to its film adaptation (though Rage of Ultron probably does a better job than Age of Ultron’s namesake 2013 event comic). But Rage of Ultron is excellent in its own right and has me chomping at the bit both for Marvel’s next standalone graphic novel and James Spader.

Addendum: Rage of Ultron’s art is also top notch. Jerome Opena, Pepe Larraz and Mark Morales turn in excellent work.

 

In Case You Missed It, or, Six Superhero Books I Loved in 2013

2013 was the first full calendar year I spent actively pursuing comic books on a weekly basis. Prior to this year I had a pretty decent stack of paperbacks and collected volumes, but it wasn’t until the end of 2012 that Geoff Johns’ Green Lantern finally got me to go into a comic book store on new comic book day and grab an individual comic book.

In the year since I’ve read a lot of comics. Some of them left me wondering how I’d been tricked into wasting three dollars on the pages of drivel in my hands, while others made me wonder why more people weren’t talking about what I’d just read.

Below are my thoughts on some of the latter. Books that I couldn’t stop thinking about with moments and characters that stuck with me long after I’d read them. There were some amazing books that came out this year that got every bit of praise and admiration they deserved. But there were also some brilliant stories, even ones by some pretty prominent writers, that seemed to fly right under the radar. I may only be a pedestrian comic book reader and my picks may not be deep cuts, but I want to talk about them.

These (six) be they.

Green Arrow #23.1: Count Vertigo #1
by Jeff Lemire and Andrea Sorrentino
September 4, 2013

DIZZY ATTACK

Remember Villains’ Month? Back in September instead of running their regularly scheduled programming DC Comics released 52 #1 issues staring 52 different villains to tie into their new event, Forever Evil. In retrospect it turns out that the real villain of Villains’ Month was DC Comics, who tricked readers into picking up a boatload of comic books with 3D covers that were pretty much all drivel.

But not every Villains’ Month issue was a waste. Greg Pak and Charles Soule in particular did excellent work in their respective Zod and Arcane issues and a hand full of other books didn’t induce eye rolls, most notably Count Vertigo.

Not only did this issue manage to keep the momentum of its parent series, Green Arrow, going while so many other Villains’ Month issues obnoxiously hit the pause button on their far-superior parent books, Count Vertigo also delivered great art and a creepy exploration of a lesser known DC Villain, Warren Zytle, who understandably decides to go by Count Vertigo instead.

There’s nothing in Count Vertigo’s origins that you haven’t seen before; an heir to the throne of a country you’ve never heard of reduced to poverty in the wake of rebellion, a poor parent selling their child into research, a man turned into a weapon only to rebel against his creators, you know this story already.

But the character at the center of it all is so off-putting that it elevates the book above Count Vertigo’s by the numbers origins. Count Vertigo is angry, very, very angry, and Count Vertigo #1 is the story of what an angry person does when they have the means to do anything.

Not only did this issue elevate the lackluster Villains’ Month initiative it was a part of, it significantly upped the ante when Green Arrow finally confronted Count Vertigo in the issues after it. It’s a nice little self-contained, dark and creep story about a C-List villain who simultaneously looks like a dork and a badass. And Andrea Sorrentino’s art alone makes it well worth the read.

Fantastic Four #5AU
by Matt Fraction, André Araujo   and Jose Villarubia
March 27

fantasticfour5au

I didn’t read Age of Ultron. I don’t know, it had a cool cover I guess, but I didn’t hear great things about it. I didn’t read Marvel’s next event, Infinity, either. I mean, I checked out the first issue but it didn’t hook me. Some heroes are on Earth and some other heroes are in space and then something else happens? I don’t know. It’s got Black Bolt in it, so maybe I’ll check it out in paperback. I was going to read Inhumanity, or Inhumans, or whatever Marvel’s newest event is supposed to be, but with the recent announcement that Matt Fraction has been pulled from the title, I’m not as inclined to read it as I was.

Long story short I’m not really an event guy. But the Fantastic Four tie-in to Age of Ultron was easily one of the most memorable books I read all year.

Fantastic Four #5AU loosely ties into the group’s journey through time and space in that when it begins they’re traveling through time and space, but its repercussions on Fraction’s Fantastic Four series are minimal and, considering I enjoyed the story without having read a page of Age of Ultron, the issue is something of a stand-alone.

The title of the issue says it all: The Death of the Family Richards During the Bloody Age of Ultron, or, “Everything’s Going to be Okay.” (Hey, what do you know? Matt Fraction writes titles like that too.)

There are two threads through #5AU, the Fantastic Four returning to an Ultron-ravaged Earth and meeting their demise at the hands of a million, billion Ultron drones and Reed Richard and Sue Storm’s children waking up on the Four’s space ship and being confronted by the group’s holographic will.

Reed Richard’s saying goodbye to his children is a moment that transcends the Age of Ultron event, the Fantastic Four series and the comic book medium as a whole. They’re words that have stuck with me long after first reading them, words I can recite and images I can imagine as clear as day.

You may have read Matt Fractions straight up phenomenal Hawkeye, but if you haven’t read Fantastic Four #5AU you’re missing out on one of the writer’s greatest works. This issue hit my where I live. It’s a great story and you should read it.

Wonder Woman #22
by Brian Azzarello and Cliff Chiang
July 17

wonderwoman22

Wonder Woman #23 was amazing. I was an exciting culmination of the issues before it that packed a ton of big character moments and plot development. It got a slew of perfect scores from across the internet and it had a really, really badass cover.

But damned if I’m not a sucker for setup.

Wonder Woman #22 finds Diana and her rag tag family band transported to New Genesis, home of the New Gods, by Orion in an attempt to save them from the wrath of the First Born back in London.

The issues before #22 had done a brilliant job of melding superheroism in the modern world with Olympian Gods and Greek mythology, but #22 kicked if up another notch by throwing an already intriguing mix into the backdrop of Jack Kirby science fiction.

And yet, despite how much of a mouthful worth of exposition setting the scene for #22 is, the issue essentially boils down to a study in family, be it Wonder Woman and the newly inherited kin she’s loosely cobbled together into a family unit under her protection, Orion and his dick dad who maybe, just maybe, isn’t totally a dick, or the First Born and his army of hyena people.

Seriously, this issue is all over the place. But under the guidance of Azzarello and Chiang, who has become the valiant steed amongst DC’s stable of artists, even a story that swerves through robot-scooters and hyena monsters within the course of 22 pages never falls apart.

Azzarello keeps Wonder Woman grounded despite the book’s far reach into fantasy. There may be hyena people, but there’s also an intimate exchange between Diana and Orion where she tells him not to try to be perfect, but to try to be better. And there may be a robot scooter, but I remember it best in regards to Orion’s triumphant return to the family band.

Wonder Woman #23 gave readers the inevitable all-out brawl that had been building up for nearly a year, and it did not disappoint. But the immediate set up to that epic confrontation in Wonder Woman #22 was anything but inevitable and equally unforgettable.

Green Lantern: New Guardians #23
by Justin Jordan, Brad Walker and Andrew Hennessy
August 21

newguardians23

Green Lantern #20 was the undeniable Green Lantern highlight of 2013. How could it not be? It was the last issue of Geoff Johns’ ten year run with the character he completely redefined. And it was great. But I already wrote about that.

What I haven’t written about, and what you might have missed this year, is Green Lantern: New Guardians #23. Unlike some of the aforementioned issues #23 isn’t self-contained. It relies on at least a casual knowledge of Geoff Johns’ Green Lantern for its emotional impact and it serves as something of a preface for the Lights Out storyline it leads into.

But everything before it and after it aside, New Guardians #23 is a story about hope shining brightest in the face of utter hopelessness. New Guardians #23 sees new villain Relic assault the home planet of the Blue Lanterns, wielders of the blue light of hope. Without getting into specifics, it’s a pretty huge downer at face value.

The Blue Lanterns have never been badasses. They don’t wield fear or rage, they don’t use light to create constructs of race cars and sharks and cannons, they’re just really, really optimistic. New Guardians #23 showcases just how badass optimism can be and its final pages are simultaneously the bleakest of bleak affairs and a swirling spiritual triumph.

New Guardians #23 is a testament to the strength of the entire Green Lantern franchise.

Daredevil #30
by Mark Waid, Chris Samnee and Javier Rodriguez
August 21

daredevil30Waid and Samnee’s Daredevil is near-universally hailed as one of the best superhero comics on stands today. I was a little bit late to the party. Month after month I’d read the book’s praises, but it wasn’t until Daredevil #30, a team up with the Silver Surfer that I rightfully surmised might be a standalone outing, that I finally got on board. And man am I glad I did.

Daredevil #30 sees Matt Murdock teaming up with the Silver Surfer to take down an alien named Ru’ach, a being who, as the Surfer explains, is a “sentient lie” that exists “on the edge of perception.” It’s an out there premise that reads more like a comic from your parents’ day than something that came out amongst the gritty, apocalyptic books on shelves in 2013. And that’s because it isn’t gritty or apocalyptic.

Daredevil #30 is just fun. Daredevil and the Silver Surfer are both cool characters. One looks like the devil and the other one was a cosmic surf board. What’s not to love? Waid and Samnee understand this and exploit it. Rather than wasting time delving deep into the Silver Surfer’s secret pain, Daredevil #30 instead offers vibrant two-page spreads of Daredevil hitching a ride on the Surfer’s board, weaving through buildings in New York City.

Daredevil is a book that fully utilizes the complete emotional spectrum. Not too long before Daredevil #30 things got dark. Really dark. And not too long after Matt Murdock found himself teaming up with Halloween monsters to face a group of white supremacists.

This Daredevil run is nowhere near monotonous and can wield heartbreak and pure joy with equal amounts of competence. But where there are plenty of well-written books that came out in 2013 that can leave you down in the dumps, few if any can reach the level of plain old fun Daredevil #30 soars at.

Batman Incorporated #13
by Grant Morrison and Chris Burnham
July 31

batmaninc13

Batman Incorporated #13 might be the greatest single issue of a Batman book I’ve ever read.

Scott Snyder and Greg Capullo have been consistently turning out top notch material in the primary Batman series since the New 52 launched in 2011 and they sure as yell didn’t stop in 2013. Death of the Family concluded in February with Batman #17, an understated and phenomenal conclusion to a grand Bat-family event, and Snyder and Capullo set about the herculean task of redefining Batman’s origins with the start of Zero Year in Batman #21. But somehow it seems like the conclusion to Grant Morrison’s Batman story, one that started in 2006 and brought together elements from the hero’s entire 70 plus year history into one vast, epic, operatic Batman opus, got lost in the shuffle this year.

The Batman canon is aged and cumbersome, so much so that it makes more sense for each individual fan to construct their own rudimentary history of the character. These histories are often bookended by Frank Miller, whose seminal works Year One and The Dark Knight Returns have come to define the beginning and the end of Batman. Somewhere in between Batman meets a young boy and takes him under his week. Sometime later a Robin dies. Maybe somewhere in your own history of Batman he has his back broken, or fights a werewolf, or travels through time.

When Grant Morrison ended his time with the Dark Knight in Batman Incorporated #13 he had made such a unique and thoughtful interpretation of the character that the events of his run have been etched permanently into my own history of Batman.

And yet you don’t need to know any of that to enjoy Batman Incorporated #13. You don’t need to have read any of the rest of Morrison’s years-long story. You probably don’t even need to have read a comic book. But if you have any appreciation for Batman then Grant Morrison’s passion for the character and the icon alike will shine through.

Batman Incorporated #13 is a 22-page master class in a character that has been around for nearly 75 years.

2014 looks like it’s going to be a pretty cool year for comics. DC is still in the midst of both Forever Evil, an event comic that is actually worth reading, and Zero Year, the aforementioned retelling of Batman’s Origins and Marvel is set to publish some exciting new books like Silver Surfer and She-Hulk.

The nature of a medium like comics isn’t very conducive to memory. There are dozens of new books every week and so spending any amount of time with just one can be hard. But in the weeks and months and years to follow I know that I’ll still find time to revisit the books on this list because even thrown in amongst various events and variant covers and tie-ins they managed to shine bright on their own merits and ingrain themselves in my memory.

 

Now that you’ve read about my favorite books of the year, why not spend the year listening to me babble about my favorite books of the week. Every week. Check out the Pony Tricks Comic Cast for a weekly literary deconstruction of last week’s comic books.

DISCUSSION QUESTIONS:

1. Do superhero books still represent the best comics have to offer? Do they  represent the worst comics have to offer?

2. Did I miss a great issue you think was overlooked this year?

3. Did you no that if you like comic books you’re a huge nerd?

For more on my favorite entertainment in 2013:

Television

Video Games

The 2013 Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson Initiative